Each in its own way, the following strategies will help you connect with potentially ideal clients.

These strategies can also be effectively applied offline and online.

Networking

Through a planned networking program, you can add people you know to your marketing activities. Since they know people you don’t know, your network contacts can connect you with people who need your help.

Thanks to the Internet in general and social media in particular, you can extend your network of contacts beyond the people whom you meet in person.

Direct Contact

Provided you act professionally and avoid SPAM, there is no reason that you can’t reach out and connect with specific individuals. This focused outreach will help you add key contacts to your network and start to build relationships with people who might need your help.

Referrals & Recommendations

The best source of new business, referrals & recommendations can generate a sustainable flow of people with whom you enjoy or can develop sound business relationships. For best results, you will need a system to ensure that you capitalize on every opportunity.

Keeping In Touch

New clients represent more than simply the fees from the initial engagement. During the time that they continue to do business with you, they can generate a significant amount of income (their lifetime value) by hiring you again and also referring others to you.

To maximize this lifetime value, it’s necessary to keep in touch with clients, contacts and any one else who can help you attract and serve clients.

Writing For Publication & Public Speaking

Few things will position you as an expert in your field better than these two activities. This is show & tell marketing at its best. In practice this means, instead of telling prospective clients how competent and trustworthy you are…you show them.

To learn more, see I Am A Professional!

 

 

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These relationships do more than distinguish professional services from standardized commodities. They also help align professional service marketing with the contemporary belief that marketing is more about developing relationships than promoting goods and services.

Businesses use a variety of marketing communications to connect with potential consumers of goods and services. Once a connection has been made, the next step is to engage interested consumers in some kind of a process leading to the decision to purchase a specific product or service.

This engagement becomes a relationship between a business and potential consumers interested in the goods or services that the business supplies. This relationship helps the business learn more about what the potential consumer need, want and expect. It also helps potential consumers understand how the business can help them.

In practice, this relationship takes the form of a conversation between the business and its interested consumers.

Ta da…there it is: the alignment between marketing as building relationships and professional service marketing. And what an alignment it is. It’s a perfect match.

The Marketing Conversation

What is a marketing conversation to many other businesses, is the same as the first stage of getting to know our professional service clients.

Following this approach allows us to see marketing in a whole new light.

Instead of struggling to understand conventional marketing concepts like advertising, promotion and sales, we can do what we do well: interact with people who need our help. We simply start the conversation, ideally as soon as connect with potentially ideal clients.

As an added bonus, the relationship-focused approach narrows your marketing challenge to just one: connecting with potentially ideal clients.

And this is where five basic marketing strategies, which might be called the professional service marketing mix, come into play. These strategies include:

  • networking
  • direct contact
  • referrals and
  • keeping in touch

To learn more, see I Am A Professional!